THE GARDENS

at the Lake Placid Public Library

A Cornell Cooperative Extension Essex County Master Gardener Visibility and Teaching Garden

The Stairwell Perennial Garden was originally created over 40 years ago. This compact urban garden tumbles down toward Mirror Lake and draws the eye of Main Street pedestrians to a view of the lake seen between the building-lined street. Please feel free to go through the gate and follow the stairs down to the Library’s lakeside lawn and gardens. Adirondack chairs and a picnic table are there for you to relax and enjoy.

The Adirondack Woodland Native Plants Garden and Lakeshore Plantings feature native plants, shrubs and trees that are found in the upland areas of the Adirondack mountains. The woodland native plants are generally more shade-loving whereas the lakeshore plantings thrive in sunnier, drier locations. In this garden, native plants are considered to be those which occurred in this region without cultivation at the time of European settlement.

The Adirondack Native Garden was created in 2000 by the Cornell Cooperative Extension Essex County Master Gardener Volunteers and friends of the Library. It is both educational and a celebration of Adirondack natural beauty. The garden was featured in the book  “GARDENS Adirondack Style” by Janet Loughrey, 2005. Many of the plants in the Native Plants Garden were “rescued” from the Brewster Peninsula Nature Trails when a section of the Jackrabbit Trail was rerouted. A list of the plants found in this garden is available and information on the native plants can be found in the GARDEN NOTEBOOK at the library front desk.

The memorial Lily Garden was established in 1984 in memory of Polly Turner by her family.  This garden was originally in the front of the library on Main Street but in the library renovation and expansion of 2000, a handicap entrance ramp was installed and the Lily Garden was transplanted to the lake side of the library. In 2001, three Dwarf Crabapple trees were planted in memory of Barbara Gottwalt on the Lakeside Lawn and a “Pink Diamond” Hydrangea tree was planted in the Stairwell Garden in memory of Matt Lynch.  In 2006, a native  Shadbush (Amelanchier sp.) was planted in memory of Anna E. Sprague.

The Backyard Composting Interpretive Site was built in 2007 as a joint venture of the Lake Placid Public Library, Cornell Cooperative Extension Essex County Master Gardener Volunteers and the Lake Placid Garden Club . The compost bins are used for all of the library garden and yard trimmings and are a teaching site for lake friendly gardening practices. The library staff, visitors and local restaurants also add to the compost. Interpretive signs are above each bin explaining the composting process.

Backyard composting is a way to reconnect to our environment. When residents and visitors see how economical, how environmentally friendly and how easy the compost process is, we hope that they will be inspired to start their own backyard composting. Finished compost is used in all the library gardens. No other fertilizers are used in the gardens or lawn. Herbicides and pesticides are never used in these gardens.

All of the gardens at the library are maintained by the Essex County Cornell Cooperative Extension Master Gardener Volunteers.

For more information about the Master Gardener Program:


Master Gardener Logo

Essex County Cornell Cooperative Extension

P.O. Box. 388, 67 Sisco Street, Westport, NY 12993
518-962-4810
ecgardening.cce.cornell.edu

Cornell University Cooperative Extension Gardening Resources

www.gardening.cornell.edu

If you have a gardening question to ask a Master Gardener:

askMG@cornell.edu
518-962-4810